Cantaloupe Sorbet with St. Germain

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Can I admit something? It’s kind of geeky. I have this thing with Australian reality TV shows. Did you know there is an Australian version of almost everything? Shark Tank, The Amazing Race, So You Think You Can Dance. Basically, if you’re having withdrawals from the end of a season, there’s an Australian version airing right now. You know, being upside down in the Southern hemisphere and all.

I type this as I binge on three episodes of Masterchef Australia. Best. Cooking show. Ever. It’s not like regular Masterchef at all. First of all, they air five episodes a week. Five episodes a week! It’s a TV marathoner’s dream.
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Secondly, the caliber of food is much higher than regular Masterchef. This is largely because the judges teach and coach the contestants rather than judge and scold. While American Masterchef challenges the contestants to make a birthday cake, Masterchef Australia challenges the contestants to make this. Plus Australian accents. I’m obsessed.
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Food culture is a funny thing isn’t it? Sometimes it’s about comfort and taste. Sometimes it’s about technique and creativity. I like to dabble in all those realms. This sweet and floral sorbet started as an idea to make a cocktail into a frozen dessert but after some recipe testing I ended up with cantaloupe and St. Germain. That combo is not in any cocktail I know of, so maybe my next step is to make this sorbet into a cocktail. In fact, you could blend a couple scoops of this sorbet with some extra spirit of your choosing and bottoms up!
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If this sorbet was on Masterchef Australia, George would say “Yum! But why haven’t you quenelled it?”
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Cantaloupe Sorbet with St. Germain
A sweet and floral frozen treat.
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Prep Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 4 cups cantaloupe purée
  2. 1 cup sugar
  3. Pinch of salt
  4. 3 tablespoons St. Germain liqueur
Instructions
  1. Combine all the ingredients until sugar is completely dissolved. Pour into a loaf pan and freeze until solid.
  2. Scoop the frozen mixture into a food processor and pulse until the mixture is smooth. Return the sorbet to the loaf pan and allow to freeze again. The sorbet should be soft and scoopable, if not repeat the process one more time.
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